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Testers’ ideas flow of the week: response on resume 90%, large organizations and question from Apple interview

In our ‘Testers ideas flow’ blog posts we collect the most active discussions in different communities about everything connected to software testing.

So you don’t need to subscribe to dozens of groups and channels – everything the most important is here. Follow the Software Testing Talks Facebook group and r/softwaretestingtalks Reddit community to get our weekly discussions lists directly to your feed.

 

Briefly, here is what folks were talking about during the last week:

💡 A developer increased the response on her resume to 90% by adding a bunch of nonsense and fakes to it 

💡 As a tester/QA/SDET do you track or does your management ask to track how many test cases you automated in a given period?

💡 What would happen at your job if you missed a very obvious bug during a round of regression testing?

💡 Am I writing test cases wrong?

💡 Can I stay remote? NO. Put resignation for new remote job. Now is, nobody knows how to do your job.

💡 Why is everything so hard in a large organization?

💡 Question from Apple interview that still won’t let me sleep well

💡 That’s why planning is important. Not to get to the right plan, but to get to the least wrong plan

💡 I see this all the time – developers writing unit tests that check implementation details instead of behavior

💡 If your test approach does not address ethical issues and the societal impact of the systems you’re building, you should not be in the business of building systems

💡 How much time does it take for a manual tester to learn and start using a testing framework in their daily tasks?

💡 2021 M1 MacBooks cut Android build times in half

 

Let’s dive deeper into the most interesting opinions.

 

Angelina Lee, Software Engineer, has experimentally proven that most recruiters don’t read developers’ CVs at the first stage of CV screening.  After being rejected several times in a row, the developer decided to add more buzzwords, fake technology and hyperlinks, and all sorts of ridiculous nonsense to her CV.

With a little creativity, she ended up with this masterpiece:

r/recruitinghell - This resume got me an interview!

The result was an astonishing – 90% response rate from companies! Reddit, AirTable, Dropbox, Bolt, Robinhood, Mux, Solv, Grubhub, and Scale.ai were among those who responded. Atlassian responded to such a request within an hour of sending it.

Angelina shared it in a Reddit post, and the post got 9734 upvotes 🔥

>> check the discussion in a r/recruitinghell Reddit community.

 

💬 💬 💬

As a tester/QA/SDET do you track or does your management ask to track how many test cases you automated in a given period?

I am curious to know how testers/QAs/SDETS in product companies or product startups measure the contribution to automated tests?

Do you get asked to give a number of tests you automated per month / quarter? What is your opinion on tracking such metrics?

I find it alarming and pointless to track these numbers and they seem more about micro-tracking just for the sake of managers and have nothing to do with product quality.

>> check the discussion in a r/softwaretesting Reddit community.

 

My favorite answer:

software testing

 

 

💬 💬 💬

What would happen at your job if you missed a very obvious bug during a round of regression testing?

>> check the discussion in a r/softwaretesting Reddit community.

 

My favorite answer:

software testing

 

 

💬 💬 💬

Am I writing test cases wrong?

Hi, new QA here.

I was tasked with starting to write test cases since we have none. So far Staff Engineer (the person to whom I am reporting) told me 2 things:

  1. Make test cases specific and reproducible, basically tests for monkeys. – Because I usually just wrote in general, like have a valid email. He wants me to write down each step.

  2. Why test navigation and other nonrelated stuff? – This is the main reason why I am writing this post. I watched lots of tutorials where for example if you are writing Sign up test cases, the first steps are always:

Go to home page => find register button => Click on it.

Instead, I only did this on the first test case, after that I had a precondition to be at www.ourhomepage/register URL.

My Staff Engineer didn’t even like that. He said why not go to that URL right away? Why bother testing navigation logic? We are testing Sign up functionality.

He is also a big fan of automating, and we use Cypress, and I get it that the best practice in Cypress is navigation through the URL, but his test cases are all about successful scenarios. Even the sign-up script in Cypress is all about successful login. He doesn’t do edge cases.

Should I state my case? Or is he correct? I just got 2 months of the first experience under my belly, so hard to go against the very experienced developer you are reporting to.

>> check the discussion in a r/QualityAssurance Reddit community.

 

My favorite answer:

test cases

 

💬 💬 💬

Can I stay remote? NO. Put resignation for new remote job. Now is, nobody knows how to do your job. 

It’s insane how some companies are taking us for granted.

I asked, I told them I wanted to stay remote, was told NO.

People started quitting and taking remote work, losing amazing talent.

I asked again, can I stay remote, NO.

Ok, now it’s my turn to put my resignation, now I’m being asked why, being told nobody knows how to do my job.

I can’t even train a replacement because, nobody wants to accept a job because it would require people to be onsite, and to move.

But nope, they are sticking to the “you must be in the office” bullshit.

By the way, my job is very well documented, if the person has the right technical background, so basically the company is looking for a well qualified individual, who is willing to pay their own expenses to move near an office, and commute daily, good luck with that shit.

>> check the discussion in a r/ITCareerQuestions Reddit community.

 

My favorite answer:

remote work

 

💬 💬 💬

Why is everything so hard in a large organization?

>> check the discussion in a r/programming Reddit community.

 

My favorite answer:

why is everything so hard in a large organization

 

 

💬 💬 💬

Question from Apple interview that still won’t let me sleep well

How would you Perform negative testing of Live mode feature on iphone camera?

Any ideas?

>> check the discussion in a r/QualityAssurance Reddit community.

 

My favorite answer:

 negative testing

 

Let’s take a look at some great insights from software testing influencers.

 

⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️

agile planning

>> Check discussion under the post here.

 

⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️

Unit tests

>> Check discussion under the post here.

 

⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️

test approach

>> Check discussion under the post here.

 

⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️

How much time does it take for a manual tester to learn and start using a testing framework in their daily tasks

 

Oleg has also created a poll for different opinions, vote there to see the stats of the community:

How much time does it take for a manual tester to learn and start using a testing framework in their daily tasks

>> Find the post and the poll under the post here.

 

⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️

Engineering time

>> Check discussion under the post here.

 

So now you know what was going on in the software testing community last week. Follow the Software Testers Ideas Flow group on FB and r/softwaretestingtalks on Reddit to get testers’ ideas flow of every week directly to your feed.

Feel free to contact me on Linkedin if you have any suggestions or ideas about Testers’ Ideas Flow blogs. I am always happy to connect with testers and get even more discussions to my feed 🙂

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